About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CNNW 26
MSNBCW 19
CNBC 7
CSPAN 7
KQED (PBS) 6
CSPAN2 5
KGO (ABC) 3
WJLA (ABC) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
LINKTV 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 93
Korean 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
president left office and fled to russia. white house correspondent jim acosta is with me, and fred polite jen is in moscow, and we will start with jim. first the president made it clear that e he is going to stand with the international community in handling the message with ukraine, and it was a tough message in the 90-minute phone call? >> yes, it was a tough message and we know that the presidents spoke a week and a day ago, but developments have been move sog qui quickly in ukraine with the russian involvement that the president came down hard today in if statement. he said that the united states condemns russia's military intervention in the crimean territory, and i want to put this up on the screen, because this illustrates the statement heref. just how concerned the white house is about what is happening by russia. the united states calls on russia to deescalate tensions by withdrawing the forces back to bases in crimea, and to refrain from interference elsewhere in ukraine. the reason i isolate that particular sentence from the statement, jim, is because it is a couple of things.
as we've been reporting all afternoon, jim. you saw the pictures coming out of the white house. defense secretary chuck hagel, cia director john brennan, talking about the situation in ukraine and discussing policy options. i should note, jim, that just outside the gates of the white house at this very moment there is a protest going on. some ukranians have gathered outside the north fence to talk about what they would like to see happen. they would like to see the u.s. get more involved. but as the hours go on, jim, i think we're going to get a clearer indication as to how this phone call went down between these two leaders. as you mentioned, they did speak a week ago friday. and you heard the president in the briefing room yesterday issuing that warning to vladimir putin that there would be costs if russia intervenes in ukraine. >> want to point out, jim, while those folks were meeting there in the white house for an emergency session in effect to discuss ukraine those pictures we just saw might explain that the president was on the phone with several world leaders including we now kn
'm melissa lee. at 5:00 for more "fast." "mad money" with jim cramer starts right now. . . >>> my mission is simple. to make you money. i'm here to level the playing field for all investors. there's always a bull market somewhere, and i promise to help you find it. "mad money" starts now. >>> hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends, i just want more days like today. my job is not just to entertain but to coach and teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. we have to learn to stop taking counsel of our fears and start taming them or we'll be out of the market on beautiful days like today with the dow soared 228 points, the s&p fell to 1.53%, and the nasdaq skyrocketed to 1.75%. s&p new highs. we need to remember that sometimes opportunities come along, opportunities like yesterday that we must act on simply because they amount to a one day sale that gives us great prices. >> buy, buy, buy! >> let's use today's session to highlight some trues about investing. i spent a ton of time talking about major themes i think can work. i've been
to be done next, jim. >> that's it. our coverage conditions with "the situation room." >>> we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. we're following the growing crisis in ukraine where tensions are rapidly escalating and the president of the united states, president obama is about to walk into the white house briefing room to make a major statement. the ukrainian government is accusing russian black sea forces of trying to seize two airports in crimea and cutting off communications between the russian majority region and the rest of ukraine. russian troops also are set to have surrounded the state television facility, some are calling it, and i'm quoting it now, an armed invasion of the country. all of this coming just six days after the ukrainian president, viktor yanukovych, was driven from the capital following deadly demonstrations against this pro-moscow president. let's go to our senior white house correspondent jim askos sta. explain this for us. >> president obama was supposed to be out here 15 minutes ago so he's running late. he was expected to be at
call jim crow. would anyone comment on that? >> thank you, mr. johnson. i -- your comments raised a couple of points. one is the issue of collateral consequences. it relates to what we were discussing and what mr. bachus alluded to. the impact of collateral consequences particularly on those who were convicted of lower level nonviolent drug offenses is just tremendous, and there's a project underway right now, under the auspices of the department of justice, being conducted by the mesh -- american bar association, to essentially catalogue all of the consequences and so policymakers and lawmakers can understand the implications of the criminalization they engage in when they make these criminal laws. >> gentleman's time is expired. last but not least the gentleman from new york, mr. jeffreys. >> thank you, mr. chair, and thank the witnesses for their very thoughtful testimony. it seems that as it relates to the problem of overcriminallization that this task force is encountering, there are potentially three areas of exploration as it relates to the problem we seek to address. you h
a background check. >> my name is sarah brady. i'm here on behalf of my husband , jim bair brady, who was loaded in the assassination attempt on ronald reagan in 1981. >> my name is dan gross. i'm here for my brother, matthew , who was shot in the head atop the empire state building in february of 1997. and for my dear friend, christopher burmeister, who was killed that day. and for the 90 americans who are killed every day by a bullet. and for everyone of us who just wants to live in a safer nation. today, as i said, we are here to mark the 20 year anniversary of what could fairly be called the greatest, most significant step forward toward that goal of a safer nation. the brady handgun violence prevention act, which took , andt 20 years ago today to introduce this special report that we have issued to celebrate the success of the historic legislation and to define the critical work that lies ahead, 20 years of brady background checks, the case for finishing the job to keep america safer. first, i would like to thank some of our special guests here. course, the victims and families t
to jim acosta at the white house. what is the latest in terms of diplomatic efforts on the u.s. front? >> president obama met with his national security advisers earlier this evening, they're not really looking at military options, at least according to what the white house is saying. they're focused on what can be done economically and diplomatically, you heard this talk over the weekend that u.s. and allies won't go to the g-8 summit this summer in russia. the u.s. is cancelling all military engagements that it has with the russians, that's a new step that took place this evening. you mentioned that secretary of state john kerry is heading over to kiev to talk about financial assistance that he is brings promises of from the united states and hopefully according to this white house from european allies, but the president believes that the world is on his side, not vladimir putin's side, the question is whether vladimir putin is listening. >> and in terms of options that the united states has. i mean, there are not a huge number of options. >> there aren't a whole lot of options, the
for us here at cnn, jim sciutto. jim, what are your sources telling you tonight? i think we've got to emphasize, the white house hasn't said much about this and nobody expected the president of the united states to come out and make a statement about the ukraine. >> well, the white house hasn't said much but they were certainly worried about it and i've been hearing from a number of different parts of the government as their anxiety grew over the last 24 and 48 hours that something like this would happen. we've all seen the public statements from u.s. officials, from secretary kerry, secretary hagel warning russia not to do exactly what appears to have happened now in the ukraine and that is, send russian troops in. u.s. officials believe these are russia troops. over time, they are getting a better handle and the extent of the troops. this is a scenario that some had warned me about. the idea of tran it would be something more sought tell, special ops and black ops to get more cover and you see the russians getting legal cover here. the ambassador to the u.n. saying that the movem
and new details about putin's conversation with president obama. senior white house correspondent jim akosta joins me now with details about that call. jim, what do you know? >> reporter: first thing to point out before i detail that phone call, we're getting word that the president is at a local fund-raiser in the washington, d.c. and told people at the fund-raiser that we may be able to deescalate this crisis in his words. the u.s. may be able to deescalate the crisis in the coming days so interesting to hear the president using the words, perhaps a hopeful sign about the way the white house feels about what's happening in ukraine at this point. but getting to that phone call, yes, as we all know it took place on saturday. 90 minutes long and according to a senior administration official briefing reporters on that phone call earlier this evening, the president and vladimir putin spent much of that time during that phone call debating the facts on the ground with respect to what's happening on the ground in ukraine. russian president basically saying that he's trying to defend the ri
can deliver, beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> clearly the administration is getting ready to act. no decision made yet on whether to impose those sanctions or, indeed, which sanctions to impose but they want to have the options ready. and today we heard the president warn that his goal is to isolate russia and make its actions in ukraine very costly. with russian troops now swarming, sovereigning ukrainian territory, preparing likely sanctions against russia. president obama vowing today to make russia's military intervention a costly proposition. >> what we're indicating to the russians is that if, in fact, they continue on the projectory that they are on, we are going to have a negative impact on russia's economy and its status in the world. >> reporter: the possible sanctions include freezing the overseas assets of russian individuals and companies, banning travel for russian leaders and businessmen and at the more extreme end, blocking some russian banks from the international financial system, an enormously costly situation for russ
. let's bring in with our national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> wolf, officials are attempting to de-escalate the crisis and avoiding any moves that may further inflame the situation. does russia expand its military intervention or does it pull back? on the ground in ukraine, there's a volatile mix of armed forces and emotions, which we saw flair up today. today in crimea, russian and ukrainian forces in a dramatic and dangerous standoff. weapons drawn and here a threat to open fire. >> i said stop! i'm serious. i'll shoot at your legs. >> reporter: and as secretary of state john kerry arrived in the ukrainian capital of kiev, a war of words. russian president vladimir putin and secretary kerry trading die metric clee opposed views of the crisis. back and forth. >> translator: the acting president, of course, is not legitimate. >> the elected representatives of the people of ukraine, they overwhelmingly approve the new government. >> reporter: and back and forth. >> translator: citizens of ukraine, both russian and ukrainian, what worries them? they are worried a
their pierce. >> jim capretta, what do you think the president is doing or not doing to close the gap? >> i think the budget is aimed at a political statement, not a legislative change. i don't think there is a chance the many proposals will be enacted. it's a political argument the democrats can carry into the november election. the white house all be admitted that's their aim with this kind of budget. back to the issue of inequality. there is a misunderstanding of how inequality came about and whether or not it affects people on the low end. inequality happened because we have a global economy and if someone finds a new idea or research effort or something that's innovative, you can do very, very well in this country if you're a part of that. does that come at the expense of people at the low end? no. there have been many, many economic studies that have shown that just because somebody at the high end is doing better that doesn't come at the expense of the low end. so the president's proposal is really a prescription for the wrong problem. secondly, even if it was the right problem, the
and jim pinkerton with the best location of the day in sunny, miami, florida. good to see you. >> good to be with you. >> joe, i have to start with you. white house press secretary jay carney doubled down on this and said also this week, those stories, a lot of them turned out not to be true. is that a winning argument for the democrats? because there are millions of people waiting to tell their stories and they're not flattering. >> well, i think what -- what reed was talking about, i think, and what jay carney were talking about is a lot of the ads that were being played. most of them made for americans by process tearty to have a ton of problems with the stories they are telling. they did this thing where they showed people receiving cancellations on their policies. it turned out those were paid actors pretending that their policies had been canceled. one woman who said her premiums had gone up, back checkers gave that one pinocchio because her premiums have gone down. there's tons of problems with the ads being run out there across the country. >> that aside, harry reid did not, to
. >>> temperatures from coast to coast, temperatures remaining dangerously low. >> jim dickey brings us all of it. good morning, jim. >> good morning. arctic air remains in place. this graphic on the left is a predicted low. to the right, that's the record. pittsburgh, detroit, cleveland, chicago. all challenging if not setting new records. many spots, well down below 0. mean while, another storm system moving into the west. you see the moisture streaming in. rain creeping towards l.a. seeing soaking rain fall here in san diego as well with strong winds much after flooding. back to you. >> jim dickey, thank you so much. private yahoo! webcams may be in the hands of the british spy agency. the guard claims they have hundreds of screen shots including intimate photographs. it is not clear how many people had their images stolen but yahoo! messager has 75 million users around the world. they say they got their information from nsa leaker edward snowden. >>> a protester appears to have smuggled a camera. capturing footage of proceeding answers posted it to youtube. cameras have never been inside the
at the military might of ukraine and russia, we'll have an international security analyst jim walsh, at the bottom of the hour, at 6:30. there's more online at aljazeera.com. we have a live blog updating the crisis in ukraine. still ahead on aljazeera.com. it's two days before fat tuesday. we'll head live to new orleans for mardi gras. plus... >> i'm stand -- stephanie stanton, the rain storms in california are on the way out. was it enough to dent the drought. >> and dreams coming true - we head to the red carpet as oscar gets ready to steal the limelight tonight. >> welcome back. after months of drought california has seen a lot of rain. it's still not enough to ease the dry spell. stephanie stanton has more. >> it is welcome rain here in this community, an hour north of the los angeles. anywhere between 1-6 inches fell. meteorologists say it's nowhere near enough to break the drought that has been plaguing california in recent years. >> a large area is at 5-25% of normal, even after the rain fall week. it puts it in perspective, and the entire area is below 50% of normal. >> the terrible thing
cost benefit analysis, ukraine is hugely important to russia. and i want to maintain high jim any over it. and these incidental sanctions can i weather them and in due course the united states and europe will back off them because they don't have staying power. i will get what they want and they won't hurt me that much. that's their calculus. what's our calculus? >> ambassador, thank you, sir. enjoy london. >> thank you. >> and general bob scales insists russian president putin is bluffing that u.s. intervention must be on the table. i will tell you most people have military fatigue and you put it on the table. >> well, first of all understand russian military forces are very weak. they don't have a draft army. not a single stealth fighter. their navy can't get out of ports. it it really is the gang that couldn't shoot straight. we have still a very strong military. we ought to leverage that asymmetry. is that a threat or actually a follow-through? there are two things there. one is a threat to sort of scare them because they have a pathetic military and the other one is to actually co
between president obama and president putin on saturday. it was reportedly 90 minutes. jim acosta literally just walked out of a white house briefing. what more have you found out about the crucial call which i think is fair to say went a pretty long time. >> it did, erin. it's not often we get a lot of details about a 90-minute phone call between the president and any leader of any country. we talked with some senior administration officials here at the white house about the situation in ukraine, and about that 90-minute phone call. according to the senior administration official, the president spent much of that time, and this goes to perhaps the whole reason why this crisis is unfolding, the president spent most of the time basically challenging putin on his facts that vladimir putin was basically saying that he's stepping in or that russia has a right to defend the interests of ethnic russians in ukraine. and that the president spent much of that the phone call basically disagreeing with vladimir putin. so i think that that goes to what we've been hearing over the last several
$1 billion in loan guarantees to ukraine. i'm going to turn to senior white house correspondent jim acosta. so, jim, you have both the secretary of state and president obama expressing a lot of support for ukraine today and the administration seemed to offer president putin perhaps a way out of this crisis. >> that's right, brianna. i think that's what the president and the administration has been saying all along through this, that there are these off-ramps for vladimir putin if he wants to bring in international observers to deal with some of these questions that he has about the safety of ethnic russians, which by the way the administration rejects, then bring in international observers. i will tell you we just came out of what was supposed to be a budget briefing and as you know the president was making those remarks earlier at a budget event. it just shows you how much ukraine and the events are dominating everything right now. i had a chance to ask white house press secretary jay carney about vladimir putin's claim that those are not russian troops in crimea and jay carney sai
anniversary of the brady handgun violence prevention act. forcontrol advocates pass expanded prevention. jim brady was shot in the head during an assassination attempt on reagan and 1981. sarah brady is the founder of the brady foundation. she is the police chief of baltimore and gun violence victims were at the spent today. >> good morning. welcome. i am the president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. we are very clear to be here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the brady law and to release our new report. before we get to those things, we want to begin by showing why we're all here. why our mission is so vitally important and why we cannot ever give up. >> good morning. my name is kenny barnes. i live in washington dc. i'm a victim of senseless gun violence. this is a picture of my son. he was killed september 24, 2001. right here in washington, d.c. on the corner of 11th and u stre et northwest. >> good morning. my name is eddie. , my mother was shot to death in front of me. the gun was also turned on me. it malfunctioned. i am here today along with other victims and su
died of lou gehrig's disease at age 29. >> as abc's jim avila reports, it is shown that traumatic brain injuries may be more widespread than originally thought. >> american kids love to play soccer. long seen as the safe alternative to u.s. football. for the first time, a soccer player has been diagnosed with cte. the very same repetitive head trauma disease found in some pro football players. >> our son, patrick, was doing headers at age three. >> patrick grange died nearly two years ago, his brain donated to scientist at boston university, studying cte, doctors announcing the frontal lobe of his brain was badly damaged. riddled with the same mind-numbing disease that leads to dementia and depression. >> getting hit in the head hundreds of thousands of times is not a normal part of life. it does not happen outside of sports and abuse. >> it is this move, the header, so dangerous for youngsters. players typically head the ball up to 12 times in a single game. watch again. that black and white sphere traveling up to 50 miles an hour. while football players are typically protected by a he
storm, we turn to accuweather meteorologist jim dickey. >> good morning, john and marci. brutal cold holding on across the north and east. many spots going to challenge records here through the early morning hours. these are your expected lows here. those would be on the left. on the right, the record. detroit, pittsburgh, cleveland, all challenging if not breaking records here. chicago is likely setting a new record for the day. a new storm system moving into california is bringing plentiful moisture here and we'll see torrential rainfall likely leading to flooding as we go today toward san diego. john and marci, back to you. >> jim, thank you. >>> in canada a blinding snow squall causing a massive pileup. nearly 100 cars and trucks slamming into each other. drivers say they couldn't see for more than three feet in front of them. there were so many damaged cars police had to tow them to a racetrack to sort everything out. >>> more chaos in ukraine this morning where armed men have seized two airports in the strategic crimea region. >> abc's alex marquardt in ukraine with the very la
this that is unrelated. you heard jim talk about the un envoy sent to crimea. that was threatened and not kidnapped. he is now safe and preparing to leave ukraine. several armed men threatened special envoy robert sari. they blocked him at a coffee shop. break this down for us. what happened and what kind of threat was this? how did he escape the coffee shop? >> we heard jim saying someone will get hurt. this un envoy has his diplomatic mission cut short in crimea. it just arrived. he visited a naval base and was leaving when armed men, 10 to 15 in number, not everyone with weapons surrounded him and demanded he leave crimea immediately and go to the airport. he got into the car he came with and refused to get out and the men blocked the car. they then were threatening him. he was described as shaken and not physically hurt. he walk and sought refuge. the late news is that the united nations is saying they are taking a late flight out and will return shortly to kiev to continue his mission. cut short by today's incident, the words of the united nation spokesman office here in new york. secretary genera
. >> that's the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff in an interview with nbc's jim miklashevski today while en route to afghanistan. that was them on the plane. general dempsey saying there he does not personally want u.s. troops to totally withdraw from afghanistan, but if there isn't a signed agreement between our government and the afghan government about u.s. troops staying on, then all u.s. forces will leave. this year. the chairman saying today that after 13 years of that war, u.s. troops accomplished their mission in afghanistan and it would not be a defeat to leave. something really specific seems to have led to today's big news about the war and the end of the war. this is defense secretary chuck hagel. this is him last october in brussels at nato headquarters. he was there meeting with all the other people who have his same job and all the other nato countries. it was the meeting of the nato defense ministers. at that meeting late last year, defense secretary chuck hagel told all the other defense secretaries in nato that by the next time they all got together, the u.s. and
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
. craig? >> all right. nbc's ian williams for us there in ukraine, thank you. want to bring in nbc's jim mecada now. we heard from secretary of state kerry and samantha power and then the white house announcement on friday afternoon that warning that there would be costs. how's russia reacting to the criticism coming from this country? >> reporter: well, if russia is putin, they're reacting like the teflon man. first of all, the reason for that is that putin wouldn't call what he's doing an act of war or aggression with all due respect to secretary of state kerry, but more of an act of self defense from his point of view, from putin's point of view, the new western or pro-western government in kiev is posing an existential threat to crimea and it's an essential war mortar port and base for the black sea fleet and he doesn't seem a bit affect bd i the criticism from abroad. putin doesn't seem to -- he doesn't seem to believe that the u.s. or its allies have the leverage to hurt him, especially when he sees the kind of reaction coming from russians out in the streets here in moscow and st.
traders are jim urio and anthony grisante in new york. jim, i will start with you. what's your best trade given what we have seen and the moves we've seen already in some of those commodities? >> i think it's oil. remember this. even if people are saying buy the dip and this situation will come to some sort of settlement in the next couple days, markets don't forget immediately what drove them to that spot. the market move can sometimes take a lifetime of its own. i think crude's up to 108, 110 because the market will remember oh, yeah, there's geopolitical risk and it's hard to be short crude. i expect that to be the best trade. >> anthony, do you agree? is there a trade higher on the list for you? >> i agree with jim only because oil was strong even before any of this started. there is high demand for our products not only in the u.s. but around the world. that can be affected. but the trade i'm looking at is gold. i think it's gotten a little ahead of itself. i really don't think in my opinion that we are going to see all out war here. gold getting good resistance. i'm looking to actua
on ukraine. let's bring in our senior white house correspondent, jim acosta. jim, the white house says it won't be sending a presidential delegation to the paralympic games in sochi, russia that, are about to begin. is this more boy costs? it looks like the g-8 summit in june the u.s. was planning on participating in, that may be gone, as well. >> reporter: that's right. and you heard secretary of state john kerry say, wolf, it may become the g-7. that russia may be expelled. want to pick up on something you were talking about with anderson cooper about that alleged ultimatum from russia to ukrainian forces about crimea. there is a state department conference call going on right now, wolf, and a state department spokeswoman, jen psaki, said they don't have any independent confirmation that ultimate yum has been issued. but if that had occurred, it would in their view constitute a dangerous escalation. so that quick response from the white house to those events, even though the russians are saying that that did not occur. you mentioned the word from the white house earlier this morning that, y
lingering fears they will not stop there. jim maceda joins us live from moscow with more on the diplomatic efforts under way. jim, what's the latest? >> reporter: hi, there, tamron, well, that meeting you referred to was indeed brief, kerry did urge lavrov to have direct talks. that seems to be an important theme now, unifying this swirl of activity. it was their first face-to-face since the ukraine crisis escalated. that is just one example of this, again, this flurry happening over the past 24 hours, tamron, the chances of avoiding war in ukraine seem to have gotten a boost from vladimir putin's comments. yesterday if you recall, he said he saw no need for the use of force in ukraine, had no desire to annex the crimean peninsula, and really that's a sigh of relief has been resinating in the international financial markets, including here in russia in moscow after historic drops on monday. that's just one example. the perception today, tamron, is that ukraine is spinning now not towards war, but some kind of diplomatic solution. in addition to kerry/lavrov meetings, more importantly, you'
to this ukraine crisis. our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto, monitoring what's going on. and, you know, these diplomats, u.n. envoy basically held there. it getting ugly. but maybe lavrov and kerry, they do have a personal relationship that goes way back. maybe they can come up with something. >> they do. relationship that helped with that chemical weapons deal in certi syria. you look at the incident with the u.n. envoy and other skirmishes. you remember yesterday we saw ukrainian and russian soldiers go nose to nose and shots fired in the air. this is why you need diplomacy now. you need the sides talking to each other, to deescalate. because you have a very volatile mix of guys with guns on the ground there, and emotions that have been stoked up by russian propaganda. and remember, these gangs, these ununiformed gangs, kind of pro-russian militias, there is a russian hand in that. that's a tool of russian power on the ground there. this is not happening by accident. those guys coming together. and you know, we've talked about this before. once you get that genie out of the
could make russia a pariah, would vladimir putin bat an eyelash? joining me from moscow, nbc's jim maceda. jim, how is putin reacting to this criticism? >> reporter: hi there. well, karen, first of all, putin wouldn't call what he's doing an act of war or aggression, with all due respect to secretary of state kerry. as putin told german chancellor angela merkel in a phone call this evening, he believes mos w moscow's actions are appropriate, and they're more about self-defense. from his point of view, the new pro-western government in kiev poses a threat to his interest in ukraine. that's primarily crimea, where today there were even more troops roaming around going from ukraine army or military post to post, as you mentioned in your lead, trying to disarm the ukrainians. when they wouldn't agree to that, surrounding them and neutralizing their bases. but crimea gives putin the essentials he wants and needs. a base for his black sea fleet. he just doesn't seem affected by all the criticism coming from abroad. putin doesn't seem to believe that the u.s. or its allies have the kind
is going to lose, the russian people are going to lose. >> jim maceda joins us from moscow. a "new york times" article quotes angela merkel having had a telephone conversation with vladimir putin saying she's not sure he is in touch with reality and he is in another world. what does this mean for an escalation of the situation here, do you think? >> what it means is we don't know what will happen next because we can't really anticipate what putin will do. putin is a product of the cold war. for him, no matter how you try to convince him otherwise, anything west of ukraine is enemy territory for him. and he in his own mind is seeing nato creeping up ever so closer -- or closely to his boarders. now, you mentioned secretary kerry going to kiev. that hopefully will calm the waters a little bit, at least keep kiev from doing something unintentionally or that unintentionally as ka lates the situation. but it is now true that the west has mobilized at least diplomatically against vladimir putin's military takeover of crimea. as you say, it's not firmly in his hands. that it's really, julia, u
and driving. two men who would never have met are now forever linked thanks to distracted driving. nbc's jim rosenfield has their story. >> i went from going an active lifestyle every day took bed ridden. >> reporter: anthony really shouldn't be here. >> i literally said to myself i'm done. >> reporter: understandable when you look at the condition of the truck he was driving one saturday morning three years ago in bucks county. this mangled sedan landed on top of the cab of his dump truck. his father was in the passenger seat. >> i remember screaming. >> reporter: the dashboard was wrapped around his legs. >> the way the wreckage of the truck was crushed it was like the roof had come down in between us. >> reporter: among his injuries his legs, pelvis, hip all broken. his brain was bleeding. his father broke his neck. the guy who hit them? >> if i had been watching the road i would not be talking to you today. 27-year-old william van camp admits he was texting and driving. >> i was talking to three different people. i'm not sure which one i was talking to at the time. >> all via text. >> th
stories you have heard. jim ingle with that. plus, a timeline on the irs targeting conservatives scandal. stay tuned. for over a decade millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exi. avoid if you te clopidogrel. for many, relief is at hand. ask your doctor abouxium. >>> the obama administration has made another change to obamacare, ordering states to pay subsidies first and verify eligibility later. retroactive enrollment idea sparked criticism from republican house energy and commerce subcommittee chairman joe pitts who called that move outrageous. complaints about obamacare from many different people are nothing new. to hear some top democrats tell it, all of those obamacare hor
have pro-russian forces who have been put into place. >> jim, obviously the fact that president obama himself spoke out about this underscores the concern within the white house right now. congressman mike rogers saying russian forces control crimea. what's the latest from your sources? >> reporter: the u.s. believes these are russian troops. whether they have the markings on their uniforms or not. and i think in light of our intelligence capabilities you can be pretty confident they know the scale of the number of troops and so on on the ground there. remember, you're looking at those videos in fact of helicopters coming in. that's a russian airplane. that's a russian helicopter that the russians used coming across into ukranian territory. the question what are the russians' intentions? they've taken over the airports, sent more troops to their sea ports there, appear to be forces around a pro-russian television station. are there intentions to protect some russian interests in crimea or do they have greater intentions to take control as representative mike rogers said at the crimean
that obamacare is hurting them. jim angle takes a look from washington. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid ignited a firestorm by calling stores about obamacare a flat out lie. >> they're horror stories being told all over american. >> >> reporter: his remarks went further questioning the truth of all complaints. >> paul krugman writes, republicans are just making this stuff up. >> reporter: jay carney backed him up. >> reporters have discovered that, in fact, the circumstances are not as they're being presented by either outside groups or republicans. >> it was astonishing to have the democratic majority leader in the united states senate get on the floor of the united states senate and call americans liars. >> reporter: republican senator roy blunt questioned reed's accusatio accusations. >> i guess you think the active imagination of missouriens are running wild because they're contacting our office constantly talking about higher premiums, higher deductibles. >> reporter: 6.2 million had policies cancelled, many pushed into far more expensive plans. >> there must be 6 million of u
national correspondent jim ingle reports it has a lot to do with this fall's elections. >> president obama's steadily delaying and dismantling his own health care law as he prepares to offer another delay in obamacare, one to postpone the political pain of cancelling millions of plans in the individual market just like last fall. >> they're going to get cancellation notices again sometime around october 1 or slightly before, and the same political issue that erupted last year would erupt again in 2014 right before the election. >> it's just getting past the 2014 elections, and it's unfortunate, but i think it means that some of his candidates in the senate are in trouble. >> at the end of last year, some 6 million people on the individual market were told their policies were canceled and forced into obamacare often with more expensive policies. having promised that people could keep their plans and doctors no matter what, the president tried to apologize. >> there's no doubt that the way i put that forward unequivocally ended up not being accurate. >> then he urged insurers and state insur
in louisville yesterday. himes.e talking with jim the national finance chairman of the house democrats. we will be talking about the 2014 field coming up in about five minutes or so. have a bit of time left. go to doug in wake forest, north carolina on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: thank you. for decades, the ar american people of wondered why the middle east continues to blow itself up. the interpretation of ancient transcripts. i would like to say that one of you to the people of arizona for helping us find ourselves on the same path. host: let's go to john in florida on our line for independents. caller: i knew this was going to be the first piece when i heard about it yesterday. -- i'mm not hearing is hearing a lot of religion and atheists. i'm not hearing the simple question, is a naturally echo you come down to the issue, nobody wants to talk about homosexuality the act. they talk about two people in love. a nice, romantic, rosy picture. when you talk about the act itself, is that a natural act? is a natural for two men to have sex? baby, i willve a vote for all the h
on ukraine. joining us now for a discussion of the coverage, jim pinkerton, contributing writer for the americany go zone and alan colmes, host of the alan colmes show, also a fox news contributor. let's get it underway, gentlemen. here is what that "the washington post" editorial says in its opening paragraph. for five years, president obama has led a foreign policy based more on how he thinks the world should operate than on reality. it was a world in which the tide of water is receding, quoting a president there, and the united states could, without much risk, radically reduce the size of its armed forces. other leaders in the vision would behave rationally and in the interest of their people and the world. invasions, brute force, great power, gains and shifting alliances. these were things of the past. so jim, the media are coming to a different point of view now? >> i think some are. "new york times" asked if obama tough enough and the "usa today" called it response late and lame, unquote. i th media, not unlike what happened with jimmy carter in the late 1970's when the ne
. >> jim cramer has been watching this morning as well. he writes in a question, too. he says in your shareholder's letter you always speak positively about fabulous ways to transport goods. do you think that keystone should be approved? i think we talked about this earlier but i didn't put you on the line. do you think keystone should be approved? >> i would vote yes. >> he always wonders about creations of jobs, too. energy and jobs, pipeline and renaissance is what jim is pointing out. >> i don't believe in the keystone pipeline because of the jobs. i believe -- i just believe it's a useful pipeline. >> you do? great. we'll continue this conversation, again, joe, we have warren buffett here. he's with us for the rest of the program. >>> okay, becky, sound goods. coming up, how the unrest in ukraine is having an impact. more "squawk box" coming up next. >>> get a leg up on the trading day with the morning "squawk" newsletter. go to our show page. go to squawk.cnbc.com. it's a snapshot of the top stories, next. sign up and get morning "squawk" delivered in your inbox every weekday. "
. >> that echoes, the comments by jim cramer this morning saying i can't figure out the bond market and wasn't afraid to say that. basically saying the ten year should be at or below, just below the 3% level. it's telling us something that stocks are not, to steve's point. >> well, tell you what, i totally disagree with jim cramer on that one but i think a bigger notion now is, if the bond market were at 3%, i think would be because of strong data. i think we've gone through kind of the taper move in may, june and july. i think right now it really is nervousness about equities in general. and i wish we had the shark tank crew in that chamber today asking some better questions. >> well, that would be interesting, to say the least. >> i would support that. >> thank you so much. steve, thank you. ricky, see new a little bit. >>> meantime, the big news today. several big name activists embroiled in the news. we broke it here on cnbc with scott wapner. dominic chu is following the action. a lot yorn plate. >> we'll try to get through it all. early think morning, third point nominating three peopl
more widespread outages by the end of the day. jim cantore has the latest for us from washington, d.c. >> reporter: how about this, winter's just cranking it out here. we've seen our temperature go from 37 degrees down to 17 degrees, so we've dropped 20 degrees since midnight. 20 degrees. of course, if you think about what happened to the roads yesterday around 50, now we refreeze them and you have a solid cake sitting on these road surfaces. cars are moving, because it's pretty flat, but once you start getting on a hill or two, in and around washington and baltimore, it gets ugly. i'll tell you, if we can get this stuff up by about 2:00 this afternoon once this precipitation begins to taper off, we're going to make headway on the roads. tonight again, single digit temperatures. the normal high for the day is 51 degrees in washington. the normal low is 34. we will start tomorrow at 9 and maybe, maybe get to 31 for a high. we won't even touch our normal low temperature tomorrow, so very, very cold there with whatever's melted underneath is going to cause problems. so far looks like w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)